Getting Personal

Some people reading this may not like or agree with what I’ve got to say, but I do feel something needs to be said. It may be modern day football that’s to blame, it may be social media, whatever it is, why do people feel the need to turn things personal against football managers and players in this day and age?

Speaking in the here and now, I am of course talking about our current manager Jos Luhukay. A quiet man and one who isn’t seeking the glamorous side of football. Before the interview he did with the Dutch press came out, I’d actually seen Jos driving his Golf at the training ground and was quite shocked that was his vehicle of choice, but it does somewhat reflect him as a person in many respects.

Now, some people will have read the last couple of paragraphs and closed the page without even getting to this point, and that’s fine, but this article shouldn’t be interpreted as me in any way suggesting that results and performances at Sheffield Wednesday have been good enough, because they haven’t been.

Wednesday should be performing a lot better in the division for a start. While a promotion push looks well and truly off the cards, Wednesday undoubtedly should have more points on the table at this stage. Some of the performances over the last 12 months have been truly dire and lacking in passion, commitment and all the other things you expect as a minimum requirement from a football team, which is far from acceptable.

Let’s face facts here, there are multiple people or groups of people who you could apportion blame to for the mess we currently find ourselves in. Do I feel Jos is solely responsible for the results and performances? No I don’t. Do I feel he’s made some mistakes? Yes I do. No football manager is perfect after all, not even Pep Guardiola.

However, in football, it’s always the manager who gets the blame, rightly or wrongly. What has become prevalent over recent times is the hammer they receive from fans, especially on across social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook. I get and understand the frustration that many feel, especially in our current predicament. I sat with my head in my hands at Hillsboro’ for most of the Bolton game.

I’m not one of these who think calling a manager a cunt or a prick is acceptable though. To me, that’s abuse and it’s really disappointing to see that it’s becoming more and more common in this day and age. I also notice the same people responding to every tweet from the club or about Sheffield Wednesday with some crass comment.

It becomes a bit of a witch hunt, like today during Jos Luhukay’s press conference live on Facebook. I always make sure to watch them, just so I’m up to speed with the latest injury news. Today’s presser saw Jos rather impassioned, he made some extremely valid points I felt, and whether he remains manager or not, these points will still be valid for anyone in the role for a good while.

To the side of the live stream there is a comments box, which was filled with the same old comments. Which, fair enough, if people wish to vent their frustration in this manner that’s fine, but I guarantee 90% of them paid no attention to what Jos was saying. I think the points he made are accurate, and while he may not be the man for the job in many people’s eyes, he deserves to be treat in a proper and correct manner.

No manager wants to fail, but sometimes, for whatever reason, it just doesn’t work. I just feel it’s going too far with some of the stuff that so called adults say on social media. We all want the club to succeed, I can’t see anyone being happy with the situation, but there’s surely a right way and a wrong way to express an opinion and criticism.

2 Comments

Rob Shirley

Agree regards abuse being unacceptable but not sure mentioning Jos and Guardiola in the same sentence is a just comparison!
There seems no justifiable reason whatsoever for the continued omission of Westwood & Hutchinson and until I hear one I will continue to think the guy is a clueless clown who should be nowhere near our club.

Reply
FootballTyper

It was highlighting that every manager makes errors, which they do. There’s no comparison made.

Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *